Historic Charleston's Festival of Houses & Gardens

Our Lowcountry adventure began with lunch in tiny Santee (a "one stoplight town" kind of place), and led us down meandering roads until we reached the Biggins Church ruins of Moncks Corner. Thought the ruins are hauntingly lovely at any time of year, this site becomes a natural garden in the spring. Surrounded by old oaks festooned in Spanish moss, azaleas in every shade of pink, and draped in wisteria, it's a photographer's dream. The church structure dates to 1761, and suffered three fires before reaching its present state of happy abandon.  

 



Just down the road is Mepkin Abbey, with a rich history of its own. Once the plantation home of Henry Laurens, the estate was gifted to a group of Trappist monks in 1949 by Clare Boothe Luce and her husband, Henry Luce. Today, you can visit the abbey and lovely botanical gardens with beautiful views of the Cooper River. For history lovers (and avid Hamilton fans!) you can visit the graves of Henry Laurens and his son John.

Our next stop was a special visit to Pompion Hill Chapel - a 1763 chapel of ease that is now privately owned and has been beautifully preserved. Situated beside the Cooper River, the churchyard's gravestones are weathered but still legible after centuries of close contact with the water, and provide a fascinating glimpse into early South Carolina life.

 



After our drive along the Cooper River, we crossed the Ravenel Bridge and arrived in Charleston. After a wine and cheese reception at our pink plastered hotel, the Meeting Street Inn, our group enjoyed a delicious dinner together at Anson's Restaurant. We're still thinking about that pecan pie...

 



Monday dawned pearly gray, with the promised rain holding off to a short shower. We began our day with a driving tour around downtown Charleston, which looped us around the Battery and up through the Citadel grounds...where we found ourselves briefly trapped on campus during a class change, as cadets kept up an endless file in front of our van. After we made our escape, our attention turned to learning more about Charleston's previous inhabitants. We met Virginia Ellison, Director of Archives and Research, and her colleagues for a special tour of the South Carolina Historical Society's archives. They treated us to a look at special items from their collection, including a lithograph of the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession, and a Union soldier’s Civil War letters. Following this thread of Civil War era history, we drove to James Island to see the community formerly - and rebelliously - named Secessionville, and uncovered the site where the first shots were fired on Fort Moultrie (now Sumter).

After a leisurely lunch, it was time to begin our touring of the Meeting Street homes with the Festival of Houses & Gardens. A few favorites were Two Meeting Street Inn, now a lovely bed and breakfast, and the Dependency of Brandford-Horry House - formerly a carriage house, now a stunning private home with an Italianate interior.

 

 

Tuesday morning saw us off to explore Johns Island and Wadmalaw Island. At the Charleston Tea Plantation, we enjoyed a trolley tour of the grounds, and even waved to the founder, Bill Hall, who was at work out in the fields. We sampled just about every type of tea imaginable, then visited the lovely, well-hidden village of Rockville and the iconic Angel Oak. After a tasty lunch at the Stono Market and Tomato Shed Cafe (the locals recommend the chocolate zucchini bread), it was time to head home. We’ll be back, Charleston.

 

Posted on March 20th in History and Culture | Small Group


Exploring Abbeville with OLLI at Furman

Explore Up Close and a group of OLLI at Furman members recently spent the day exploring Abbeville, South Carolina. This day trip included sunny backroads drives through South Carolina farmland, stories about Abbeville's French Huguenot roots and local history, and exploring some of Abbeville's beautifully preserved buildings.

 

Our first stop: a driving tour of significant colonial and Civil War sites with local guide, Fred Lewis. We learned about blockhouses built during the colonial period, which were fortified log buildings meant to withstand attacks from Native Americans on the frontier.  We also visited Secession Hill, where Abbeville became the first South Carolina district to secede from the United States - a month before the state of South Carolina officially seceded in December 1860. Fittingly, Abbeville was also the place where Jefferson Davis would come at the end of the Civil War to meet for the last time with his cabinet before conceding the Confederacy's defeat.

We enjoyed walking around Abbeville's downtown square, surrounded by colorfully painted historic shops and buildings, including the Abbeville County Courthouse (designed by South Carolina's Robert Mills), Opera House, and the Belmont Inn. Abbeville’s lovely rose-hued Trinity Episcopal Church is another highlight, built in the Gothic Revival style in 1860.

 

After a leisurely lunch, which featured several decadent Southern pies for dessert, we made our way to the Burt-Stark Mansion for a house tour. This historic home was built in the 1830s, designed after a home that the first owner’s wife fell in love with in the Hudson River Valley. Most interestingly, the house's architect was one of the family slaves, Cubic, who was sent to the Hudson River Valley to draw plans for the construction of this house. His role in the design and building of the house is especially remarkable, since laws were passed in 1831 that outlawed slave literacy and travel. The Burt-Stark house was also the site where Jefferson Davis stopped as he fled south after Lee's surrender at Appomatox, where his generals finally convinced him to accept defeat. Inside, we enjoyed looking at the architecture, period furniture and antiques, including a collection of early 20th century dresses owned by the Stark family daughters.

 


Thanks to OLLI at Furman for joining us on this South Carolina Trip of Discovery!  

Posted on March 7th in History and Culture


Christmas Tour of Homes 2018

This Southeastern Trip of Discovery took us through the scenic backroads of South Carolina's Old 96 District, with a stop in Edgefield, South Carolina, before crossing the Savannah River into the Georgia Piedmont. We then visited the beautifully decorated private homes and historic buildings of Washington, Georgia, as part of the town's annual Christmas Tour. Holiday fun at its finest!

The Thomson, Georgia home of Thomas Watson - prominent Southern Populist politician and lawyer.

Our group enjoyed a private tour of the impressive Edgefield County Archives, which contains some of South Carolina's rarest historical documents and best preserved records.

The stately Chantilly at Brookhill, a former cotton plantation and dairy farm.

 

Keeping warm with some hot cider. 

Does anyone else love vintage Christmas decorations like we do? 

Posted on December 15th in Small Group


New York with OLLI at Furman

New York with OLLI at Furman

I recall, Central Park in fall... At Explore Up Close, we think New York may be at its most pleasant in the fall, especially for Southern visitors. The brisk yet pleasant weather and changing foliage makes it a perfect time to explore the city by foot. Explore Up Close spent five days exploring New York's historic neighborhoods and sites with an OLLI at Furman (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute) group from Greenville, SC. The trip was born of a "New York, New York" class taught at OLLI at Furman in the spring of 2017, and our itinerary included many highlights of the class. Our group fearlessly hit the streets and the subway to take it all in!

 

 

Our first stop was Grand Central Terminal - not to be confused with Grand Central Station, the nearby post office. At Grand Central, we took in the impressive architecture and history of the Beaux Arts style train station. We also enjoyed a tour of the Morgan Library and Museum, where we marveled at the incredible collection of books, art, and striking interiors. The art lovers in the group also visited the Neue Galerie on the Upper East Side, where we saw Gustav Klimt's "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I,” which may also be known to cinema fans from the film “Woman in Gold.” The Neue Galerie also features an impressive array of Austrian art and design work from the early 20th century.

 

For the outdoors lovers among us, Chumley led the group on a jaunt through Central Park to soak in the changing leaves and crisp fall air. Highlights from the park included views of the Bethesda Terrace and Fountain, the Strawberry Fields homage to John Lennon, and Belvedere Castle. For a special aerial view of the city, we crossed the East River on the Roosevelt Island Tram. With all our walking and sightseeing, we kept our energy up with an onslaught of New York delicacies - bagels, sandwiches, and Italian food, oh my!

 

We didn't just stay in Manhattan. Our group braved our way through the fog across the Brooklyn Bridge, and made the journey over to Liberty and Ellis Island. We continued to learn about New York’s immigrants’ stories at the Tenement Museum on the Lower East Side. Finally, one of our favorite highlights of the trip was a night out at the award-winning Broadway show, Come From Away, which brought to life an incredible true story of hope and humanity following the 9/11 attacks. The end of the show included a rousing rendition of Gaelic-folk rock music that had us all on our feet.

Thanks to all who came and enjoyed the sites and bites with us!  Until next time, New York.

 

Posted on November 14th in History and Culture